Why would a wealthy nation reduce the chance for children to play musical instruments?

I recently left a teaching job I loved because the council had implemented a new policy: charging a fee for instrumental music lessons in schools, that used to be free. Instrumental staff argued that it was a backward step; the council argued that it could improve the instrumental music service! The council needed to save money; instrumental staff argued that the amount they would have to charge to make their saving was prohibitive. The council offered concessions for those on low incomes and free lessons for those receiving free school meals (distracting us from the fact that state education should be free for every child). That’s a fair deal, they reckoned. But, we argued, that doesn’t take into account that parents firstly have to acknowledge that they can’t afford to pay and secondly fill in forms and show proof of their income. Some people won’t want to admit they can’t pay. Some people get stuck at ‘filling in forms’. What’s more, not all parents are aware of or have time to care about the value of learning to play an instrument. About one-third of my pupils were withdrawn from lessons by their parents as soon as the policy came into effect and the ethos of equality in the provision of instrumental music lessons in schools was destroyed in favour of a market driven service. It may save the council ‘a drop in the ocean’. A reduction in the number of pupils in some areas has led to some surreptitious cutting of jobs: posts not filled, total hours reduced and staff redeployed and overstretched.

I believe there should be more provision of free instrumental lessons in schools. We need more staff, so more children can have lessons and we should include non-western instruments. Imagine how that would improve the appreciation of our nation’s cultural diversity if children were offered lessons on instruments such as the Indian sitar, the Chinese erhu or the Arabic oud? I believe the benefits to society, to health and particularly mental health, justify the cost of instrumental lessons on moral grounds. If it has to be justified economically then the cost of improving children’s future health, education and well-being through music would balance the overall cost in the long run: reducing the pressure on the NHS, police and social services in the future.

But, apparently, each department has its own budget and savings have to be made.

We are a wealthy but stupid nation. Let’s look at the bigger picture, let’s join the dots: somewhere out there, there’s somebody who can do the sums, can we fix this now please?